ECTESOL Review Volume 2 Number 1

Published by the ECTESOL Review

© Emerald Coast TESOL, Pensacola, FL.

ECTESOL Review is open access. Users are allowed to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of the articles, or use them for any other lawful purpose, without asking prior permission from the publisher or the author. All intellectual property published in ECTESOL Review and used in another intellectual work must include citation information along with a link to the Emerald Coast TESOL website.  Republication by an author in another publication must be approved in advance by the ECTESOL Review editor.

Editor: Laureen Fregeau



ECTESOL Review Advisory and Editorial Board

Cesar Bazo, Auburn University, Auburn, AL

Ukaiko Bitrus-Ojiambo, St. Paul’s University, Nairobi, Kenya

Suhana Chikatla, Sabatical, Montgomery, AL

Arlene Costello, Escambia County Schools (Retired), Escambia County, FL

Laureen Fregeau, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL

Amany Habib, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL

Robert Leier, Armenian-Russian University, Yerevan, Armenia

Vicki Murphy, Oakcrest Elementary School, Pensacola, FL

Timothy Rodriguez, Walden University, Minneapolis, MN

Sandra Rogers, Spring Hill College, Mobile, AL

Kathy VanDyck, Pensacola State University, Pensacola, FL

Welcome to ECTESOL Review! This is the peer-reviewed open-access journal of Emerald Coast TESOL. This publication is designed to reflect the broad membership of our organization. We welcome submissions of scholarly inquiry, essays and discussions, descriptive reports on innovative approaches, classrooms and programs, practitioner materials and book reviews from K-12 teachers, adult educators, college ESOL instructors, ESOL teacher educators, EFL/TEFL professionals and individuals interested in policy, cultural competence and international issues related to English language learning.  If you are interested in submitting a piece for consideration, please download the Information for Authors from our website. Submissions must be sent as word documents to ECTESOLReview@mail.com.  All submissions are blind reviewed.  Authors are not charged for publication.

We also welcome applications to join our editorial board as a reviewer.  We are looking for individuals who would be willing to review between 3 and 6 submissions per year.  The review process is a “rapid response” format where reviewers commit to completing their reviews in 15-30 days. This format means authors will not have their submissions.  If you are interested please fill in the application and forward it to the email at the bottom of the form.

Emerald Coast TESOL also publishes a quarterly newsletter: ECTESOL Bulletin. The Bulletin publishes lesson plans, cultural information, a list of helpful web links, program highlights and other relevant articles. Submissions for the newsletter are reviewed by the editor.

We hope you enjoy ECTESOL Review and find useful and interesting information to help you in your professional life!

Contents

Editor comments …………………………………………………………… v

          Laureen Fregeau

The Use of Response to Intervention with English Learners
…………………………………………………………………………………… 1-5

         Anna Burnley

Not “One China,” not “One Culture”: Multicultural Exploration of Differences and Similarities between Mainland China and Taiwan ….……………………………….. 6-9

         Phillip J. Ward and Michelle Loo

Connecting North and South: Engaging Latin American English Learners, Kenyan Intercultural Communications and American Undergraduate Students through Reciprocal Service Learning ……………………………………………………………………………………10-22

Laureen A. Fregeau, Ukaiko Bitrus-Ojiambo, Suhana Chikatla and William Cornejo

Context-Focused Grammar Teaching: A Comparison between English Present Perfect and Past Tenses and Effects on Korean English Learning ……………………….. 23-31

Seungheui (Ellie) Lee

Employing Word Study with Spanish-Speaking ELLs ………………….. 31-34 

Timothy Rodríguez

Editor’s Comments

We begin the second edition of ECTESOL Review with an examination of how Response To Intervention can be employed to improve academic support for ELs in K-12 settings.  In The Use of Response to Intervention with English Learners Anne Burnley explains that RTI can assist teachers in adjusting instruction to support ELs in acquiring English and content-area knowledge and learning behaviors. The use of RTIs with ELs can supplement support for ELs as an integrated concept of the sheltered instruction (SI) commonly provided for this student population.

Our second article looks at the subtle but important differences between Taiwanese and Mainland Chinese cultures. Using data gathered through cultural immersion experiences, interviews with cultural consultants and literature research authors Phillip Ward and Michelle Loo create a mini-workshop that can be used to inform education professionals about cultural differences.

In our third article Laureen Fregeau, Ukaiko Bitrus-Ojiambo, Suhana Chikatla and William Cornejo continue their exploration of international videoconferencing with a study of how reciprocal service learning offers ELs in non-English-speaking countries opportunities for discourse with native English speakers, how exposure to different world Englishes open cross-cultural understanding and how unequal power in collaborations between the Global North and South can become more equitable through applications of critical theory to project design.

Seungheui (Ellie) Lee, author of our fourth article explores reasons behind challenges Korean ELs encounter in learning past and present tenses in English. Through a comparison of the Korean and English, she illustrates how these tenses are used differently in each language and how these differences may lead to negative transfer and the difficulties Koreans encounter using the tenses correctly in English.

Teaching decoding and spelling skills to Spanish-speaking ELs can be a challenge.  In our final article author Timothy Rodríguez explains how understanding the differences between Spanish and English can prove useful.   Rodriguez explains how strategies utilizing cognates and having ELs work closely with words through word sorts and making words support ELs in their efforts to navigate the sound-letter relationships of English.

Oval: ETR

ECTESOL REVIEW

http://emeraldcoasttesol.org/ectesol-review-v2-1-2/