ECTESOL Review Volume 3 #1

Table of Contents

Oval: ETR

ECTESOL REVIEW

Volume 3 Issue 1, 2020

Editor: Laureen A. Fregeau
Published by the Emerald Coast TESOL

© Emerald Coast TESOL, Pensacola, FL.

ECTESOL Review is open access. Users are allowed to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of the articles, or use them for any other lawful purpose, without asking prior permission from the publisher or the author. All intellectual property published in ECTESOL Review and used in another intellectual work must include citation information along with a link to the Emerald Coast TESOL website.  Republication by an author in another publication must be approved in advance by the ECTESOL Review editor.

Editor: Laureen Fregeau



ECTESOL Review Advisory and Editorial Board

Cesar Bazo, Auburn University, Auburn, AL

Ukaiko Bitrus-Ojiambo, St. Paul’s University, Nairobi, Kenya

Suhana Chikatla, Independent Consultant, Montgomery, AL

Laureen Fregeau, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL

Amany Habib, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL

Robert Leier, U.S. Department of State

Joseph Heilman, TESL/TEFL Consultant, WA

Timothy Rodriguez, The Ameican College of Education

Kathy VanDyck, Pensacola State University, Pensacola, FL

Welcome to ECTESOL Review! This is the peer-reviewed open-access journal of Emerald Coast TESOL. This publication is designed to reflect the broad membership of our organization. We welcome submissions of scholarly inquiry, essays and discussions, descriptive reports on innovative approaches, classrooms and programs, practitioner materials and book reviews from K-12 teachers, adult educators, college ESOL instructors, ESOL teacher educators, EFL/TEFL professionals and individuals interested in policy, cultural competence and international issues related to English language learning.  If you are interested in submitting a piece for consideration, please download the Information for Authors from our website. Submissions must be sent as word documents to ECTESOLReview@mail.com.  All submissions are blind reviewed.  Authors are not charged for publication.

We also welcome applications to join our editorial board as a reviewer.  We are looking for individuals who would be willing to review between 3 and 6 submissions per year.  The review process is a “rapid response” format where reviewers commit to completing their reviews in 15-30 days. This format means authors will not have their submissions.  If you are interested please fill in the application and forward it to the email at the bottom of the form.

Emerald Coast TESOL also publishes a quarterly newsletter: ECTESOL Bulletin. The Bulletin publishes lesson plans, cultural information, a list of helpful web links, program highlights and other relevant articles. Submissions for the newsletter are reviewed by the editor.

We hope you enjoy ECTESOL Review and find useful and interesting information to help you in your professional life!

Contents

Editor comments ………………….……………………………..……..………..iv

          Laureen Fregeau

The Benefits of Implementing Cognitively-Demanding and Context-Embedded Language Translation in the EL Classroom……………….. 1-4

Timothy A. Rodriguez

Syntactic Accidents in Spontaneous Speech Speakers of English and Armenian ……………………………………………………………….………. 5-21

Karen Velyan

Student-directed ESOL Family Literacy Program Design………. 22-31

Laureen A. Fregeau and Robert D. Leier

Heritage language maintenance: research review and reflection of one family case ……….………………………………………..………..…….. 32-46

Josiah Chan

The Reflective Approach to Teaching Culture within the EFL Classroom ……………………………………………………………………..…….47-54

Lucia Șchiopu

Book Review: Prism Intro Student’s Book with Online Workbook Listening and Speaking, and Reading and Writing by Sabina Ostrowska, Kate Adams, Wendy Asplin, and Christina Cavage, Cambridge University Press, 2017 ………………………………………. 55-57

Robert D. Leier and Laureen A. Fregeau

Editor’s Comments

We begin the second edition of ECTESOL Review with an examination of how translation from L1 can be beneficial to ELs when it is context-embedded rather than the more typical concurrent translation approach which is cognitively-undemanding and context-reduced. In The Benefits of Implementing Cognitively-Demanding and Context-Embedded Language Translation in the EL Classroom Timothy Rodriguez gives us details on how purposeful translation that is context embedded translation can be cognitively demanding and can be employed to improve English learning in K-12 settings.

Our second articleby Karen Velyan, Syntactic Accidents in Spontaneous Speech Speakers of English and Armenian presents a cross-linguistic comparative analysis of the cases of syntax in the speech of low socioeconomic status speakers of English and Armenian. Velyan explains the phenomenon of syntactic accidents, specifically, what the author terms maxi-accidents, mini-accidents and micro-accidents that come up in spontaneous speech. Velyan’s research demonstrates how these syntactic accidents interrupt the natural flow of speech primarily in the speech of second language learner.

In our third article, Student-directed ESOL Family Literacy Program Design, Laureen Fregeau and Robert Leier describe a student-directed program design process used to gain understanding of what would constitute an ideal program for the participating ELs, their families and their community. Participants identified areas of design importance including site locations, time and frequency of class scheduling, curricular design, instructional materials, instructor training and program evaluation) that can determine successful family literacy programs.

Our fourth article, Josiah Chan’s Heritage language maintenance: research review and reflection of one family case, documents the Mandarin Chinese learning experience of three children who were born in the United States of a migrant family from Hong Kong where the Cantonese Chinese dialect language is more predominant. Chan tells about their journey maintaining Chinese as their children’s heritage language. This journey takes three children through their experiences in the US and China and describes strategies their mother employed to help them learn Chinese.   

In our fifth article The Reflective Approach to Teaching Culture within the EFL Classroom Lucia Șchiopu examines an approach to teaching culture in the EFL classroom which creates and builds discourses by looking at stereotypes and stereotypical knowledge. The described approach involves the construction of meanings that shape the quality and depth of cultural sensitivity and awareness. A fundamental issue in the approach is to unpack the cultural differences between the learner’s culture and the L2 culture. A reflective approach expands the learners’ new cultural knowledge and at the same time dispels misconceptions.

Our final article is a book review of Sabina Ostrowska, Kate Adams, Wendy Asplin, and Christina Cavage’s Prism Intro Student’s Book with Online Workbook Listening and Speaking, and Reading and Writing published by Cambridge University Press. In this review Robert Leier and Laureen Fregeau describe the text’s contents, usability and pro and cons.