ECTESOL Review V1 n1 Table of Contents

Oval: ETR

ECTESOL Review

Volume 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 2017

Editor: Laureen A. Fregeau


Published by the ECTESOL Review

© Emerald Coast TESOL,Pensacola, FL.

ECTESOL Review is open access. Users are allowed to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of the articles, or use them for any other lawful purpose, without asking prior permission from the publisher or the author. All intellectual property published in ECTESOL Review and used in another intellectual work must include citation information along with a link to the Emerald Coast TESOL website.  Republication by an author in another publication must be approved in advance by the ECTESOL Review editor.

Editor: Laureen Fregeau



ECTESOL Review Advisory and Editorial Board

Cesar Bazo, Auburn University, Auburn, AL

Ukaiko Bitrus-Ojiambo, St. Paul’s University, Nairobi, Kenya

Suhana Chikatla, Ph.D.

Arlene Costello, Escambia County Schools, Escambia County, FL

Amany Habib, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL

Robert Leier, Zamorano University, Francisco Morazan, Honduras

Vicki Murphy, Oakcrest Elementary School, Pensacola, FL

Timothy Rodriguez, Walden University, Minneapolis, MN

Sandra Rogers, Spring Hill College, Mobile, AL

Kathy VanDyck, Pensacola State University, Pensacola, FL

Welcome to ECTESOL Review! This is the new peer-reviewed open-access publication of Emerald Coast TESOL. This publication is designed to reflect the broad membership of our organization. We welcome submissions of scholarly inquiry, essays and discussions, descriptive reports on innovative approaches, classrooms and programs, practitioner materials and book reviews from K-12 teachers, adult educators, college ESOL instructors, ESOL teacher educators, EFL/TEFL professionals and individuals interested in policy, cultural competence and international issues related to English language learning.  If you are interested in submitting a piece for consideration, please download the Information for Authors from our website. Submissions must be sent as word documents to ECTESOLReview@mail.com.  All submissions are blind reviewed.  Authors are not charged for publication.

We also welcome applications to join our editorial board as a reviewer.  We are looking for individuals who would be willing to review between 3 and 6 submissions per year.  The review process is a “rapid response” format where reviewers commit to completing their reviews in 15-30 days. This format means authors will not have their submissions.  If you are interested please fill in the application and forward it to the email at the bottom of the form.

Emerald Coast TESOL also publishes a quarterly newsletter: ECTESOL Bulletin. The Bulletin publishes lesson plans, cultural information, a list of helpful web links, program highlights and other relevant articles. Submissions for the newsletter are reviewed by the editor.

We hope you enjoy ECTESOL Review and find useful and interesting information to help you in your professional life!

Table of Contents

Editor comments ………………………………………………………………V

          Laureen Fregeau

A Study of Teacher Talking Time and Student Talking TimePractices among ESL Instructors at an Intensive English

Program…………………………………………………………………………….1

Cesar R. Bazo Quintana

English language competence: Why English matters in higher education in Kenya …………………………………………………………… 9

Ukaiko A. Bitrus-Ojiambo, Iddah Wayumba Mwaura, Annette

Lutivini Majanja

Unprepared: Are Educator Preparation Programs Effectively Training Pre-Service Teachers to Teach English Learners? ………………………………………………………… 22

Lorie Johnson

Understanding Saudi Student Integration in the U.S.: A Studyon Saudi Students at a Southeastern Institution …………………………28

Carrie Melius

Employing Cueing Systems to Decode Text and Negotiate Text-Meaning in a Second Language ………………………………………………………………….. 41

          Timothy Rodriguez, Laureen Fregeau, Mary Kay Moskal, Robert D. Leier

Understanding Teacher Talking Time and Student Talking Time Practices among ESL/EFL Teachers: A Practicum Design ……………………………………………………………………………. 50

Cesar R. Bazo Quintana

Editor’s Comments

Laureen Fregeau

We begin our first issue with a study by Bazo examining Teacher Talk Time (TTT) and Student Talk Time (STT) in intensive English classes at a southern university. Bazo’s study demonstrates that participating ESL instructors were oriented more towards TTT practices while teaching their regular lessons. The study has helped participant ESL instructors become more aware of the behaviors that are conducive to both increased TTT and increased STT practices in their classes.  This, in turn, can lead to improved teaching practices, which will benefit ESL students from enhanced instruction.

The article by Bitrus-Ojiambo, Wayumba Mwaura, Lutivini Majanja looks at English in the context of Kenyan higher education. The study assesses English language use in a Kenyan institution of higher education, identifies emergent linguistic patterns, and suggests some solutions to observed gaps between emergent patterns of English use vis-à-vis Standard British English (BSE).

Johnson’s essay reiterates what many ESOL professionals have long contended and that many have discussed: that preservice and in-service teachers continue to be inadequately prepared to work with English Learners. The article makes an eloquent plea for this situation to be remedied and offers suggestions to adequately prepare teachers.

Melius uses Mezirow’s (1996) transformative learning theory and Barker’s (1981) neo-racism theory to examine Saudi students experiences integrating into U.S. higher education. In her study Melius found that Saudi students contended with serious issues of stereotyping that affected their adjustment to American culture. She suggests approaches to improve adjustment to institutions of higher education.

Rodriguez, Fregeau, Moskal and Leier examine the role of cueing systems in EL literacy. Based on a case study of an EL and his teacher, this article explains types of cueing systems, how they are employed by ELs in decoding text and how knowledge of these systems can enhance success for teachers of ELs.

Our final article outlines a practicum design based on Bazo’s study of Teacher Talk Time (TTT) vs. Student Talk Time (STT) in IEP classes. The practicum can be employed in any level ESOL or EFL program to improve the balance of STT and TTT and move towards a communicative approach in the classroom.

ECTESOL Review V1 #1